Here’s what we did with your feedback

Below are some of the projects we have recently consulted on and their outcomes.

We asked

In May 2021, we conducted the annual survey that captures the community’s perception of safety in the central city and helps ensure the actions and activities occurring as part of our Central City Safety Strategy are still working or what areas need to be focused on.

You said

Over four weeks, we received 799 submissions. Some of the themes as to why people feel safe in our central city included crowds, security officers including the City Safe team and good lighting in certain parts of the central city. Some of the themes as to why people feel unsafe in our central city included the presence of homeless people, anti-social behaviour including fights, gatherings of youths loitering, intoxicated people and lack of road safety.

We did

The results were reported to the Community Committee meeting in August 2021 for their review and will be used to inform Council on priorities and activities to focus on improving safety in the central city for the next financial year.

We asked

In response to a NZ Police request to address illegal and inappropriate behaviour in The Boulevard area (Te Rapa), we proposed a night-time Light Motor Vehicle Prohibition, under the Hamilton Traffic Bylaw 2015. This proposal was consulted on with the businesses and property owners located in this area on these streets: The Boulevard, Kahu Crescent, Norman Hayward Place, Parkinson Place, Udy Place, Barnett Place, De Leeuw Place and Simsey Place. 

You said

The businesses and property owners in this area were in favour of supporting the Light Motor Vehicle Prohibition, which means cars, utes and vans are banned from these streets between the hours of 9pm and 4am, unless they are there on legitimate business.

We did

The Light Motor Vehicle Prohibition was accepted and will be brought into effect in 2021.

We asked

In January/February 2021, we asked the community if Korikori Green (a road in Rototuna North connecting North City Road and Kimbrae Drive) should be declared a pedestrian mall. This would mean a section of Korikori Green is closed to through traffic, unless prior permission from Council has been given to open Korikori Green to vehicles in relation to an event in Korikori Park or the surrounding area. The proposed change supports the development of the Rototuna Village, and the increasing number of people who travel through this area on foot or bike, and our focus on making our transport network safe for all.

You said

Over four weeks we received 154 submissions. Of those, 73% agreed with Council’s proposal to declare a section of Korikori Green a pedestrian mall. Some of the top themes to support this change were centred around making it safer for everyone; that it would prevent traffic issues such as speeding, those who use it as a short cut and when they result in traffic jams; that it will prevent cars using it to race along; and that it will promote walking and cycling.

We did

The pedestrian mall declaration and closure of Korikori Green to through traffic was brought into force from June 2021. This means the electronic bollards midway along Korikori Green are now raised. They can be lowered when vehicles need access to the park, such as when there are large sports events.

We asked

Earlier this year Hamilton City Council sought public views on proposals to change the policy as part of a scheduled review. The consultation process included discussions with central city businesses and food truck operators as well as the wider public.

You said

We considered 90 submissions, 77% in favour of allowing food trucks to operate, with two submitters speaking at the Council’s Hearing and Engagement Committee.

We did

We approved changes to the policy to allow food trucks and mobile shops to operate, provided it is as part of a permitted wider event, and not one solely based on food vending. Food trucks would be limited to operating only during the hours the event was permitted for.

The policy also changes the area covered by the policy, extending it to include all that area between London St and Knox St, and between Angelsea St and the Waikato River.

Council noted the policy’s intent is to add vibrancy to the central city, but it was also important to ensure policy changes considered the views of existing central city businesses. A review of the policy and its benefits for the central city has been scheduled for 2023.

The revised policy, including a name change to the Trading in Public Places Policy, was approved unanimously. View the Trading in Public Places Policy.

We asked

In October 2020 we proposed changing the speed limit on all residential streets within the Huntington and St James areas from 50km/h to 40km/h as part of our ongoing focus on safer streets for all. 

You said

Over 3 weeks we received 58 submissions. Of those, 25 were in support of a reduction of the speed limit from 50km/h to 40km/h on all residential streets within the Huntington and St James areas

We did

The lower 40km/h speed limit was approved at the 1 December Hearings and Engagement Committee meeting. It will come into effect on 5 April 2021.

We asked

Council consulted the community over four weeks in August and September on three possible locations for the new area. Tauhara Park in Rototuna and Resthills Park in Glenview were also considered.

All three parks are already off-leash exercise spaces and have existing infrastructure such as off-street parking and toilets.

You said

We received 1478 public submissions, with a strong concentration of feedback from residents near the three parks.

Tauhara Park and Minogue Park were the most popular community choices with 583 submissions in favour of Tauhara Park and 582 in favour of Minogue Park.

We did

We chose Minogue Park for Hamilton’s first fenced dog exercise area. The new 1ha area can be built further away from neighbours and doesn’t require a resource consent, so construction can start earlier.

Funding of $177,000 for the new pooch play space was approved through the 2018-28 Long-Term Plan. The new area will be designed to blend into the park. It will be planted with natives and will include seats and a doggy water fountain. Rules of use will be clearly displayed.

Construction will start in mid-October and the area should be open in time for summer.

We asked

As part of the review of the draft Hamilton Gardens Management Plan, we asked what you thought about a new layout concept for Hamilton Gardens. This was a revision of a concept put to the community in 2019. The changes allow for further development of the Gardens and address issues such as congestion, traffic flow and improving the Gardens’ connection with the river.

You said

We received 875 responses with 84% of respondents in favour of the new concept.

Some people asked to make an oral submission to the Council. You can read more about the Hearings and Engagement Committee meeting and some of the ideas presented by the public here. The committee agenda includes a full report on the community engagement, which identifies common themes such as parking, alternative modes of transport and developing pedestrian access across the river.

We did

The Community Committee will consider the draft Hamilton Gardens Management Plan again later this year, including feedback from the community on the Gardens layout and other aspects of the draft management plan. We will update this page after that meeting.

We asked

Earlier this year we asked what you thought of our draft design for an upgrade of Nawton’s much-loved Elliot Park playground and skatepark. We’re extending and improving the skatepark, renewing play equipment and park furniture, and adding a half basketball court and more shade.

You said

We received 115 responses with most positive about the design, especially the addition of a half basketball court. The skate community asked for changes to some of the new skatepark features.

We did

We made some changes to the final design of the skatepark based on your suggestions. We reduced the number of quarter pipes, added new features, including a replica fire hydrant, and adapted others for beginner skaters.

Construction will begin in July so the playground can reopen in time for summer 2020.

We asked

Earlier this year we asked you what you thought about our city's parks, playgrounds, river paths and natural areas.  375 people responded.

You said

We did

The Parks and Open Spaces Team will use the feedback from the survey along with the Hamilton Play Strategy results received earlier in the year to develop further priorities as part of the Council’s 2021-31 10-Year Plan.

We asked

The Council asked for public feedback on the draft Hamilton Speed Management Plan which included seven principles and 4 prioritisation areas.

You said

We received 125 submissions. 80% of the submissions were in favour of the principles and prioritisation process set out in the plan.

We did

The Council decided on 18 June 2019 to adopt the Hamilton Speed Management Plan 2019. The 2015 Speed management Policy was retired.

We asked

Quentin Residential Ltd (QRL) lodged a proposal for an enlarged Special Housing Area (SHA) site at Quentin Drive near Hamilton Lake. The enlarged site comprises the original 2ha Quentin Drive SHA proposal approved by the Council on 10 May 2018 (which is still with the Government for a final decision), plus the site currently occupied by Jack House Transit Limited. The enlarged site is 4.17ha and proposes a yield of 111 homes in total, equating to accommodation for approximately 300 people.

We sought feedback on the proposal from residents in the area for four weeks (18 March 2019 to 12 April 2019).

You said

We received 37 responses, including five supportive responses, eight raising concerns and 23 opposing responses. There was support for more housing in the area, noting that the area was well located near existing amenities such as the lake, hospital and town. Supporters also noted that there was sufficient traffic infrastructure to manage vehicle movements from Quentin Drive. There were concerns about traffic, access to schooling, safety, noise, increased crime and the loss of privacy. Submitters also identified concerns regarding poor drainage.

We did

We invited submitters to speak to their feedback at an Extraordinary Council meeting on 29 April 2019, and several parties took up this offer. As a result, the resolution to recommend the proposal to the Government was amended to include a requirement for QRL to work with Te Haa o te Whenua o Kirikiriroa to complete a cultural assessment prior to applying for a qualifying development consent and for a piece of land adjacent to the site to be regarded as an affected party.

The application is now with the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development for consideration. The letter to the Minister noted that, in addition to their contractual obligations, QRL has committed to work with local residents to address their concerns.

We asked

Two proposals for Your Rototuna were provided for consideration. These reflected the community’s wishes to “create a welcoming community village with flexible, inviting, connected and usable spaces”. Both two proposals presented were possible within the $19.6M budget. We asked for people’s views on what they liked, or didn’t like about them, as well as the views on where the Council should prioritise spending in Rototuna. We used the feedback received to review the proposals and help us develop a final concept.

You said

Overall, residents stressed they wanted a village that would be a place where everyone could feel at home: inclusive, welcoming and connected to the wider community.  There were themes that emerged which will and are being considered in the next phases of design – including a common desire to see the Rototuna village celebrate the past, future and diversity of all people who live there.

Specific elements of feedback on the two proposals included:

  • use of good lighting and clear connections for people
  • developing North City Rd with pedestrians, cyclists, mobility scooters as priority users
  • providing specialised car parks near key destinations for specific users such as people with higher mobility needs
  • skatepark and playground to be further away from the library entrance
  • ensuring all key recreational facilities are within sightline of each other
  • using different varieties of trees that will enhance shade and add character and colour
  • creating a real sense of “heart” and activity in the village square and establishing this as a linking element between all facilities
  • making buildings interesting and colourful
  • providing a public toilet.

We did

We received more than 1000 comments on the proposed Rototuna village designs which were then used to develop the updated “Rototuna Revisited” proposal. Which can be found here.

We asked

In March, we ran a three-week public engagement process to determine where the next fenced dog exercise area should be constructed in Hamilton.

This project is part of our Pooches in Parks plan, which also outlines where dog owners can exercise their pets off-lead in specified parks around our city. The new fenced dog area is an outcome of the 2018-2018 10-Year Plan.

We ran a simple public consultation process, giving the community an opportunity to nominate which of three parks was the preference for this new asset.

The parks were:

  • Innes Common
  • Tauhara Park
  • Resthills Park

The consultation ran for three weeks, and included a direct invitation to registered dog owners and dog clubs to provide comment.

You said

We had more than 1320 responses to our online and postal engagement survey for this project.

Innes Common emerged as the clear favourite, preferred by more than 650 people who responded. Tauhara Park was selected by 454 respondents, with Resthills Park the least preferred with just 183 responses.

Respondents who preferred Innes Common noted its central location and the fact it is already a popular park for people who want to exercise their dogs. Safety, popularity and ease of access were also cited as reasons this park was preferred.

We did

Our staff will now begin project planning for the construction of a fenced dog exercise area at Innes Common. The specific site is on the southwestern side of the park, behind the Hamilton Yacht Club complex.

This project will be completed by the end of the 2018/19 financial year.

We asked

Between November 2018 to mid-January 2019 we sought your feedback on the Draft Plan. We asked whether you agreed with the general direction of the plan, and whether you had any suggestions to improve the plan.

You said

We received 10 responses. There was agreement on the general direction and that the plan is easy to follow. The inclusion of community gardens was suggested. A lot of the feedback related to operational matters that staff can address outside the scope of the plan.

We did

We included a general section on community gardens, and reference to Council’s community gardens guidelines. It was not considered appropriate to identify specific parks for community gardens as this is better determined when community groups express interest in establishing sustainable community gardens. Minor changes were also made to the Draft Plan to improve clarity and readability. 

We asked

We asked the public about their views on the Council’s preference to retain the existing two-ward system for the 2019 election (its initial proposal for representation). The public had one month to make a submission as part of this process, ending on 24 September. It should be noted that this formal consultation process was preceded by robust pre-consultation during which multiple representation options were canvassed with the public.

You said

37 people completed a submission and 8 (22%) were in support of the initial proposal and 29 (78%) were opposed. Those who were opposed sought alternative arrangements, including:

  • a change from the existing ward structure to an at-large system (11 submissions),
  • a change from the existing ward structure to increase the number of wards (11 submissions)
  • a reduction to the current number of councillors (5 submissions),
  • an increase to the current number of councillors (2 Submissions), and
  • the establishment of community boards (3 submissions).

We did

On 1 November 2018, following the mixed and contradictory feedback received through formal consultation, and the lack of a single, prevailing view about what the fairest and most effective representation arrangements for Hamilton are, the Council decided to adopt its initial proposal as its final proposal, that is, to retain the existing two-ward structure for the 2019 election. To find out more, please refer to the 1 November 2018 Council Report which is available online here.  The next steps in the Representation Review process are outlined in the timeline on our website here. The Council will know for certain what its representation arrangements are for 2019 on or before 11 April 2019.

We asked

We have asked for community feedback annually on the perceptions of day and night-time safety within the CBD for 5 years now to monitor progress on the Central City Safety Strategy.  515 responses to the community survey were received, with results for the 2018/19 year indicating an improved perception of safety which is supported by indicative police data showing a reduction of crime in the central city.

You said

Although the perception survey results indicate that people are feeling safer than last year in the CBD at night, it is acknowledged that there are still improvements needed to meet people’s aspirations of a safe CBD.  Comments received highlight the need for continual work around upgrading lighting, which will occur this year, as well as addressing the culture of alcohol consumption and anti-social behaviour.

We did

Council produces an annual Action List outlining the work occurring across the organisation to support the ongoing implementation of the Strategy. 

We asked

We asked the public for feedback on multiple options for representation arrangements for Hamilton back in June 2018. This was part of the pre-consultation phase of the Representation Review for the 2019 Elections, a process every council around New Zealand is required to undertake at least every six years. The Representation Review considers things like the number of wards (if any) that is best for our city, how many councillors we have and whether we should have community boards.

You said

Prior to the online pre-consultation survey, 1665 people responded to our Community Profile Survey which ran from 15 February to 30 April 2018. This survey included a question about the current representation arrangements for the city. 36% of the respondents to this survey thought the current representation arrangements for the city were adequate, 47% did not know and 17% did not think the current arrangements were adequate. 

In June 2018, 420 people completed our online pre-consultation survey which asked for feedback about four possible representation options for our city (‘at large’ (no wards), status quo, more wards and a mix of ‘at large’/wards). The survey also included questions about how many councillors we have and whether or not we need community boards.  38% of the people who completed the survey cited a preference for an ‘at large’ system and 41% preferred wards (either two wards or more than two wards). Full results of this survey can be found in the Council Report from 16 August 2018 here (points 54-102).

Further feedback from the public was also sought during pre-consultation, via a phone survey (500 respondents) and focus groups (25 participants). The survey and the focus groups focused on more specific questions to gain further clarity on feedback received via the online survey. 

The overall results from pre-consultation take into account multiple datasets, but a full summary of findings is available in points 93-102 of the 16 August Council Report online here.

We did

The Council considered all the feedback received during pre-consultation, alongside the broader research, and decided that the existing two-ward system remains the best fit for Hamilton for at least the 2019 election.  The status quo (the existing two-ward system with a Mayor elected across the whole city and no community boards) then became the Council’s initial proposal and was followed by a month-long formal consultation process, during which the public were again invited to submit feedback.

We asked

The Council asked for public feedback on the proposed Hamilton City Speed Limit Bylaw 2018 which included two changes; to enable future speed limits to be set via Council resolution, and to change the speed limit on Gordonton Rd.

You said

We received 145 submissions on the two proposed changes. 86% of the submissions were in favour of the change to the bylaw to allow speed limits to be set via Council resolution and 82% of the submissions were supportive of the proposed change to the speed limit on Gordonton Rd.

We did

The Council decided on 6 September 2018 to adopt the Hamilton City Speed Limit Bylaw 2018. The new bylaw and the new permanent 60km/h speed limit on Gordonton Rd will come into effect on 10 October 2018.

We asked

The Council sets out its priorities, plans and budget for the next decade in its 10-Year Plan. This plan is reviewed every three years and the current one 2015-25 10-Year Plan is now due for review.  In March 2018 the Council prepared a 2018-2028 10-Year Plan Consultation Document which outlined the four big challenges we face as a city, how the Council planned to address them and some alternative options.

The four challenges were:

Challenge 1: We are borrowing to pay for everyday costs. 
The Council put forward a preferred option of two years of 9.5% rate increases, moving immediately to a capital value rating system and introducing a $500 Uniform Annual General Charge (UAGC). There were another five options presenting different combinations of the above.

Challenge 2: Deciding where Hamilton’s next big housing area will be.
The Council put forward two options, Peacocke in the south of the city or Rotokauri in the northwest of the city.

Challenge 3: Improving Hamilton’s transport system.
The Council proposed an investment of $251 million in transport improvement across safety improvements, transport choices and managing congestion.  Two alternative options were proposed being invest at a lower level of 10% less or invest at a higher level of 10% more.

Challenge 4: Investing in community infrastructure.
The Council proposed nine projects at a cost of $70.7 million.  An additional six project that the Council considered but did not include were also provided.

Consultation was open from 29 March to 30 April 2018.  Submissions could be made through the online form, completing a paper form, or provided free text in email or letter.

You said

We received 2189 submissions from the community on the 2018-28 10-Year Plan Consultation Document.  1756 of these were from individuals and 223 from organisations or business.  244 submitters presented verbal submissions over the week of 11-17 May 2018.

The feedback provided by comments and by the selection of options was summarised and provided to the elected members along with all the submissions. The full detail can be found here in the submission analysis report.

A summary of feedback to each challenge is outlined below:

Challenge 1: We are borrowing to pay for everyday costs. 
48% of those who answered the question supported keeping the rating system the same as it is now.  The key message from the commentary was that the amount of rate increase was too high and the Council should look for efficiencies to reduce costs.  Many businesses have budgeted to move to capital value rating over the remaining 7 years of the transition and would find an immediate move financially challenging.

Challenge 2: Deciding where Hamilton’s next big housing area will be.
Peacocke was the preferred choice selected by 73% of those who answered this question. The feedback commentary encouraged the Council to plan for the impact of more housing on transport congestion and to ensure community parks and hubs are provided as the new areas are developed.

Challenge 3: Improving Hamilton’s transport system.
The option to invest at a lower rate of 10% less was the most selected option by 50% of those who answered the question, followed by 40% who selected to do the full programme of $251 million.  The commentary feedback highlighted the community’s concern about safety on our roads, the need for improved public transport, the connection of cycleways for schools and improved safety for cyclists by separating cyclist from roads.

Challenge 4: Investing in community infrastructure.
Over 84% of those who answered the question did not think the 9 projects proposed by the Council were the right mix. The commentary feedback encouraged the Council to invest in community facilities, parks, sport parks, playgrounds and libraries. Many of the community thought having attractions were important for residents and for bringing visitors to the city. There was a strong message that ‘new’ projects should be delayed until the rates are at a more affordable level.

We did

After two days of deliberations on the city's 10-Year Plan finishing on Friday 1 June, the Council has set the projects and budget for the decade ahead, subject to formal adoption on 28 June. The decisions on each challenge are outlined below.

Challenge 1:  We are borrowing to pay for everyday costs.
After considering verbal and written submissions through public consultation, and making changes to the draft Plan, average rates changes have been set at a 9.7% increase for 2018/19 and 3.8% annually after that. This is a reduction from the rates proposed in the draft 10-Year Plan of two years of 9.5% increases and an immediate transition to UAGC and capital value rating.

Over the next three years, the Council will complete the transition to full capital value rating, a process begun in 2015.

There will also be a three-year transition to a UAGC of $500. The transition amount for 2018/19 has been set at $165. The UAGC is a fixed portion of rates and not an additional charge. 

The Council has also required the Chief Executive to deliver an $83M reduction in operating expenses over the 10 years of the Plan.

Challenge 2: Deciding where Hamilton’s next big housing area will be.
The Peacocke growth cell is the Council’s preferred growth option, ahead of Rotokauri. Opening Peacocke for development is supported by a 10-year interest-free loan from the Government plus significant NZ Transport Agency subsidies and will include a new bridge across the Waikato River.

Challenge 3: Improving Hamilton’s transport system.
The full transport improvement programme of $251M has been endorsed, funding three investment areas – managing congestion, improving safety, and supporting transport choices such as walking, cycling and public transport. The Council has decided this programme provides the best option for meeting the transport needs of the city over the next 10 years and responds to the issues raised through submissions. More than half of the $251M programme is expected to be funded by subsidies from NZ Transport Agency.

Challenge 4: Investing in community infrastructure.
The Central City Park - River Plan proposal, a vision to purchase and demolish buildings to create a new park area and open Victoria St to the river, has been amended. The Council resolved to remove all funding in the proposed plan other than $7M to purchase property.

The Council resolved to support the proposed Waikato Regional Theatre, committing $25M to the $73M project. Philanthropic group Momentum Waikato is raising the remaining $48M from across the region, including a proposed $5M from the Waikato Regional Council. Hamilton City Council would not own or operate the new theatre but would support it with a $1.1M annual operating grant.

A $19.6M project for a community hub in Rototuna has been endorsed. The hub will include a library, public square, part of the development of a town centre in the suburb, and space for a swimming facility to be developed separately with a commercial operator.

A proposal for an entrance charge at Hamilton Gardens this year was not supported, the Council instead opting for a multi-faceted approach to funding the Gardens. This includes a targeted rate on all city ratepayers of $10 in the first year of the 2018-28 10-Year Plan, increasing by $1 per year for the following nine years. The Council also resolved to seek a proposal from the Hamilton Gardens Development Trust to complete the Gardens development and identify funding options which could include a future entrance fee for international visitors and enhanced donations.

Hamilton’s Playgrounds of the Future Plan has been supported with a resolution that one third of the funding to implement the plan is to be sought from external funders, and approving $5.5M in capital expenditure across the next 10 years.

The Council has also endorsed a $4M grant towards the construction of a new indoor recreation facility in partnership with the University of Waikato. This facility will be available for community use.

The Council has not supported the draft Plan’s proposal for an upgrade of Garden Place, but has requested staff seek expressions of interest from the private sector to fully fund improvements and has allocated $100,000 in Years 1-3 of the 10-Year Plan to support the Hamilton Central Business Association’s plans to activate the central city.

The city’s sports parks received a boost as the Council resolved to allocate $3M in capital expenditure in Years 2-4 of the 10-Year Plan for a programme of drainage and irrigation improvements, plus a further $711,000 in operating expenditure in Years 2-10.

Funding has been confirmed for a new fenced dog exercise area at a cost of $177,000, with the location to be decided following community consultation.

We asked

In November, a proposed policy was approved by Hamilton City Council (the Council) for consultation between February and March 2018 asking for public feedback. The proposed policy (found within the statement of proposal, here) was a sinking lid policy with no relocations or mergers allowed whereas the existing policy is a sinking lid policy only allowing for limited relocations and mergers.

You said

74 written submissions were received at the close of the consultation in March 2018 and 26 verbal submissions were heard in April 2018.

The written responses received have been published and are available to view by clicking here.

A majority, 56 out of 74 (76%), of the written submitters stated that the proposed policy was too restrictive.

We did

The Council decided in May 2018 to retain its existing policy which allows for limited relocations and mergers. The existing policy is scheduled for review by September 2019. A link to the existing policy can be found on Council's website at www.hamilton.govt.nz/policies  or click here to view.